General Information Website to Learn About Izu Islands and Ogasawara Islands

An island of thrills

Hahajima

A subtropical “nature land,” preserving pristine nature
An eco tourism base with various indigenous species, and whales.

BASIC
INFORMATION

Area size
21.21 sqm
Circumference
58 km
Distance from Tokyo
1,059 km
Population
480 as of 2017
SIGHTSEEING SPOT
Mt. Chibusa

Mt. Chibusa

The highest mountain, with a 463-m elevation, among Chichijima and Hahajima islands. There are some indigenous plants unique to the Ogasawara Islands and some indigenous species that are only seen on Hahajima in dense forests. Such wild birds as meguro (bonin honeyeater, a special protected species) can be seen close-up. The mountaintop offers a commanding view of Okuzure Bay.

Rosu Kinenkan

Rosu Kinenkan

Rosu Kinenkan is a local museum established in 1987 with an external wall made of rosu stone. The building used to be a storehouse for sugar. The rosu stones that are used as a building material and that are unique to Hahajima were discovered by a German national named Rohlfs, from which the name of the museum derives. Rohlfs came to the island in 1870. The museum introduces the daily lives of the island’s inhabitants and has an activity corner where visitors can experience making a craft using screw pine leaves.

Sekimon

Sekimon

Sekimon is a field of uplifted karst located on the north side of Mt. Chibusa. Indigenous plants not seen anywhere else, such as procris boninensis and sekimon trees, can be seen. Sekimon is designated as a forest ecosystem preservation area, and being accompanied by a guide certified by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government is required when entering.

Miyukinohama

Miyukinohama

Located on the south side of Oki Port, Miyukinohama Beach’s name derives from the fact that Emperor Showa visited in 1927 to collect specimens of living organisms. This area is designated as a special protection zone and marine park, and is an ideal place for snorkeling. Fossils of foraminifera called “nummulites” seen on the beach are exceptionally big and are an important evidence for gauging the geological age of the Ogasawara Islands.

Mt. Ko-Fuji, or “Little Fuji”

Mt. Ko-Fuji, or “Little Fuji”

Located at the southern tip of Hahajima, Mt. Kofuji is a small mountain and is the most southerly “Furusato no Fuji” (“local Mt. Fuji”) in Japan. At the mountaintop, a beautiful ocean view of table corals well formed in Minamizaki spreads just in front of your eyes, and such birds as boobies can be seen depending on the season. This area used to be a Japanese military base and some pillboxes and trenches still remain.

Samegasaki Observation Deck

Samegasaki Observation Deck

Close to Oki Port, which is the entrance to Hahajima, Samegasaki Observation Deck is accessible on foot. Roofed with chusan palm, this rest house has a tropical atmosphere and is a popular place to spend some time just relaxing. A monument carved with the inscription “Asu-e”, or “for tomorrow,” was built to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the reversion of Hahajima to Japan. The observation deck not only offers a sweeping view of Oki Port but also sometimes a view of whales in the distant offshore sea.

ACCESS&DURATION

Access by boat
Access by boat

*As the operation schedule and required time varies depending on the season, contact the operation companies beforehand.

MORE INFORMATION

Ogasawara Hahajima Tourist Association
TEL: 04998-3-2300
Industry and Sightseeing Division, Ogasawara Village
TEL: 04998-2-3114
Ogasawara Village Tourism Bureau